FAQs about Brand & Packaging

Design Questions

Whether it’s watching TV, reading a magazine, or walking the grocery store aisles, your packaging is often a consumer’s first point of contact with your brand. It’s important to make a clear statement about who you are as a company.

All the components related to a product, service, company, or person is “brand identity.” Some of these items are the name, logo, tone, tagline, typeface, and shape that create an appeal. Brand Identity is the message the consumer receives from the product, person, or thing.

Whether it’s watching TV, reading a magazine, or walking the grocery store aisles, your packaging is often a consumer’s first point of contact with your brand. It’s important to make a clear statement about who you are as a company.

All the components related to a product, service, company, or person is “brand identity.” Some of these items are the name, logo, tone, tagline, typeface, and shape that create an appeal. Brand Identity is the message the consumer receives from the product, person, or thing.

A packaging designer balances the shelf appeal (design and messaging) with the functional aspect of product safety and protection. On the functional side, it’s imperative that when you ship your product to a customer, distributor, or retailer, it arrives in the same condition it was in when it left the factory or warehouse.

Packaging also has to carry a clear message regarding the features and benefits of the product in a way that is easy to see and understand. You have a fraction of a second to get the consumer’s attention amidst all the other products you’re competing with.

The principal aim of packaging design is to attract consumers. The packaging should sell itself. This means you need to have a strong brand identity and packaging that communicates information about your product clearly, concisely, and in a way that is relevant to your target audience. Your package is your brand ambassador and is a key success factor in pitching the retail buyer.
Choices about your packaging design are as significant as decisions about the product itself. Don’t rush the process. Be sure you’re have packaging that will protect your product and but also represent it the best it can.

Talk to us and we will help you through the whole process.
Establishing what goals/challenges you have. You bring your intimate knowledge about your product and vision on where you want it to be. We do the rest.

We have extensive experience in large FMCG packaging as well as small startups and family owned businesses. We guide you through the whole process and make the transformation of your product into a consumers desirable as smooth as possible, so you can concentrate on your business in stead of worrying about the details of how it should look.

EASE . QUALITY . CARE . RESULT

Production Questions

A dieline is a digital file that contains all relevant design notes, cut lines and markings for your brand’s box, envelope, sign, brochure or product packaging.

No, you do not need a dieline at the beginning of a packaging design project – it can and often does come later. If working without a dieline, knowing your general format (box, bottle, tetrapak) and providing general dimensions, materials, and goals will help your design partner create the best solution and generate mockups. The benefit of having a dieline at kickoff is it will save time and money down the road on production updates to art.

Your final dieline will come directly from your physical packaging producers – such as a printer, glassmaker, or material vendor. A professional designer has the experience, industry insight and software to complete your dieline for you. Be sure to give them a list of all required information, dimensions and a few images or existing products to use as inspiration. If you already have spoken to a manufacturer or printer they will be the one’s to make or review the designer’s dieline.
Depending on the project and their in-house specifications, they may request adjustments so it’s as structurally sound as necessary. Once it’s ready for print, they will create a prototype and send it to you for review and approval.

You will need to purchase and register a Company Prefix and Item Number using the GS1 Standards system to attain a EAN13 number that works properly at Australian retail.
Once you have number we can create it for you, or you can supply an eps file format to us.

No, we can help with finding the right fit for you.

Colours look brighter and more vibrant on-screen because screens tweak colours and use LED backlights to make the image as clear and bright as possible. Also every screen is different. Printed packaging is inks on paper, CMYK for images, Pantone for flat colours.

A huge variety of factors go into what the final colour looks like in print packaging – from simple things like the type of ink or printer you use, and on what paper/substrate it is printed.

Choices about your packaging design are as significant as decisions about the product itself. Don’t rush the process. Be sure you have packaging that will protect your product but also represent it the best it can.

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